Historical Campaign Games

Introduction: The Historical Global War campaign game combines the European and Pacific Theaters of A World at War into a single game which recreates all of World War II. Likewise, the European theater campaign game recreates the European part of World War II, and the Pacific theater campaign game recreates the Asian-Pacific part of World War II. These scenarios differ from the corresponding standard campaign games in that diplomatic, research, production and mobilization results are already provided, based on the historical actions of each country. Players do not allocate research or diplomatic points, make research or diplomatic rolls, track tensions, or determine which units to mobilize.

The historical campaign games are intended for use by players new to the game who want to begin play as quickly as possible, without the need to assimilate all of the rules for diplomacy, research, intelligence and mobilizations. They may also be used by players wishing to assess their tactical prowess with some of the strategic decisions already made by their historical counterparts, or used as benchmarks for players working out their own diplomatic, research, production and mobilization plans in a standard campaign game.

The historical scenarios include the historical German attack on Russia (Summer 1941) and the historical Japanese attack on the United States and Britain (Winter 1941). The American, Russian, and - to some extent - Japanese mobilizations are based on these events; they cannot be altered without undermining the basic tenets of the historical scenarios.

The initial situation, rules, and victory conditions for the corresponding standard campaign game apply, except as set out below.

Diplomacy: The diplomatic results achieved by each major power are provided in the Historical Events Chart.

Research and Production: Research and production results are already provided on the historical force record sheets and on the Historical Events Chart. The rules that govern the research results obtained still apply. The value of the research result is the value of the modified die roll. To interpret the result, refer to the Research Tables. In addition, the following rules are in effect for the specified results:

       Railhead/Fort results may be held for future use and may be accumulated. For each result, a faction may choose between the placement of a railhead or a fort. No more than one railhead and one fort may be placed in the same turn. In any case, a faction choosing to place a fort may place two beach defenses instead.

       Harbor attack research results may be held for future use and may be accumulated.

Mobilization: The units historically mobilized by each power have already been added to the historical force record sheets. The following additions to a country's BRP base and level should be made for each of their mobilizations as indicated on the Historical Events Chart. In the Global War and European scenarios:

       Italy - adds 10 BRPs to its BRP base and level

       Britain - adds 10 BRPs to its BRP base and level

       Russia - constructs an IC; adds the IC's BRP value to its BRP level

       U.S. - adds 25 BRPs to its BRP base and level (for both Atlantic and Pacific mobilizations in Global War; only for Atlantic mobilizations in European scenarios)

In the Global War and Pacific scenarios:

       Japan - adds 10 BRPs to its BRP base and level

Tensions: Tension levels are not tracked and effective tension rolls are not made -- the historical tension levels are set out in the Historical Events Chart. Once Germany is at war with the U.S., USAT are set to 50 and the USAT from the Historical Events Chart is ignored.

National Capabilities

The historical campaign game BRP levels, growth rates, starting force pool levels and additions, unit construction limits, basic airbases and replacements are set out on the historical force record sheets. Use the full set of sheets for a Historical Global War campaign. For a Historical European scenario, use only the European sheets (Italy/Germany, France/Britain, the European columns of the Russian sheet, and US/European). For a Historical Pacific scenario, use only the Pacific sheets (Japan, Britain/China, the Pacific columns of the Russian sheet, and US/Pacific).

The standard scenario cards, which contain the Naval Construction Charts and space for allowable builds, isolated units and minor country units, should be used to keep track of units which are currently in play. Use the Global War, European, or Pacific campaign game sheets as appropriate.

Declarations of War: Major powers are free to declare war as they wish, subject to the normal restrictions, with the following exceptions:

       Germany and Italy may not declare war on Spain.

       Germany must declare war on Russia in Summer 1941.

       Japan must declare war on the U.S. and Britain in Winter 1941, and may make no other declarations of war prior to that turn.

       Russia may declare war on Japan in Summer 1945, but not before, regardless of the relative sizes of the Siberian and Manchurian garrisons.

Russian Siberian Garrison: Russia transfers one 3-5 armor unit, two 3-3 infantry units and one AAF from Siberia to Europe in response to the German attack in Summer 1941. These units are included on the European Russian force pool chart, but not on the Pacific Russian force pool chart. In the Global War and European scenarios, these units begin in the Urals box; Russia may SR these units onto the European mapboard during the Russian Fall 1941 redeployment phase.

British Home Garrison (Global War and European scenarios): Beginning the turn France surrenders and continuing through Spring 1942, the Allied player must garrison Britain with at least 10 ground factors, 10 army air factors, and 50 naval factors. For each turn in which there are insufficient units in Britain at the end of the Allied player turn, the final outcome of the scenario is shifted one Victory Point in the Axis player's favor.

British Garrison of Gibraltar (Global War and European scenarios): Beginning the turn after France has surrendered, Britain must garrison Gibraltar with at least three ground factors. If this requirement is not met at the end of an Allied player turn, Spain activates as a German minor ally at the start of the following Axis player turn.

Shipbuilding (Global War and Pacific scenarios): All nations use the shipbuilding charts for the corresponding standard campaign game, which show the naval construction underway in Fall 1939. In the Global War and Pacific scenarios, the United States and Japan must also lay down the carriers and capital ships they historically started between Fall 1939 and their entry into the war. The Historical Events Chart gives these ships and their starting dates.

Japanese Manchurian Garrison (Global War and Pacific scenarios): Japan may reduce its Manchurian garrison from 45 BRPs to 30 BRPs in Summer 1941. Japan must maintain a 30 BRP garrison until Summer 1945 or until Japan declares war on Russia, whichever comes first.

Japanese Forts (Global War and Pacific scenarios): Japan may not build forts until Winter 1941.

United States Navy (Global War and Pacific scenarios): The Yorktown, which begins in the Atlantic, must be transferred to the Pacific Fleet as soon as there are sufficient ships available for it to be assigned to a carrier TF. Likewise the Wasp, which is launched in the Atlantic in Winter 1939, must also be transferred to the Pacific Fleet as soon as it can be assigned to an additional carrier TF. See 51.25 for rules on pre-war U.S. carrier TFs.

British Reinforcement of the Pacific Theater (Global War): Britain may not send any ground, air, or naval forces that would trigger a USAT decrease to the Pacific before Winter 1941.